• Unit:  Cultural Conversations
     
    Time Frame
    TEKS
    Depth and Complexity
    I
    D
    M
    Non- Negotiable Resources
    NOTE:
     
    Standards listed are
    those
    tested on
    the STAAR/EOC
    exam.
     
    Additional
    standards are
    taught,
    especially
    listening &
    speaking
    standards.
    READING READINESS STANDARDS:
     
    5(A)  Analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to the success of the plot as a whole in a variety of works of fiction.
     
    8(A)  Analyze the controlling idea and specific purpose of a passage and the textual elements that support and elaborate it, including both the most important details and the less important details.
     
    9(C)  Make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns.
     
    Fig. 19B  Make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding (Expository).
     
    READING SUPPORTING STANDARDS:
     
    2(C)  Relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting.
     
    3(A)  Analyze the structure or prosody (e.g., meter, rhyme scheme) and graphic elements (e.g., line length, punctuation, word position) in poetry.
     
    6(A)  Evaluate the role of syntax and diction and the effect of voice, tone, and imagery on a speech, literary essay, or other forms of literary nonfiction.
     
    7(A)  Explain the function of symbolism, allegory, and allusions in literary works.
    9(D)  Synthesize and make logical connections between ideas and details in several texts selected to reflect a range of viewpoints on the same topic and support those findings with textual evidence.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    WRITING READINESS STANDARDS:
     
    13(B)  Structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outline, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning.
     
    13(C)  Revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed.
     
    13(D)  Edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling.
     
    15(A)  Write an [expository] essay of sufficient length that includes:
    (i)  Effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures
    (ii)               Rhetorical devices, and transitions between  paragraphs
    (iii)             A thesis or controlling ideas
    (iv)             An organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context
    (v)               Relevant evidence and well-chosen details.
    (vi)             Distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, ideas that support the thesis statement.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    VOCABULARY TEKS:
     
    1(B)  Analyze textual context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to distinguish between the denotative and connotative meanings of words.
     
    1(E)  Use general and specialized dictionaries, thesauri, histories of language, books of quotations, and other related references (printed or electronic) as needed.
     
     
     
     
     
     
    The student will recognize how we define ourselves as individuals through our interactions with external cultural forces.
     
    The student will recognize the role that culture plays in defining ourselves as individuals.
     
    The student will identify and understand significant cultural conversations within a variety of media sources.
     
    The student will articulate how external factors affect one’s sense of identity.
     
    The student will compare and contrast differences in similar themes expressed in different time periods.
     
    The student will analyze archetypes in mythic, traditional and classical literature.
     
    The student will relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting.
     
    The student will analyze the structure or prosody and graphic elements in poetry.
     
    The student will analyze how archetypes and motifs in drama affect the plot of plays.
     
    The student will analyze differences in the characters’ moral dilemmas in works of fiction across different countries or cultures.
     
    The student will evaluate the connection between forms of narration and tone in works of fiction.
     
    The student will evaluate the role of syntax and diction and the effect of voice, tone, and imagery on a speech, literary essay, or other forms of literary nonfiction.
     
    The student will explain the function of symbolism, allegory, and allusions in literary works.
     
    The student will explain shifts in perspective in arguments about the same topic and evaluate the accuracy of the evidence used to support the different viewpoints within those arguments.
     
    The student will evaluate how messages presented in media reflect social and cultural views in ways different from traditional texts.
     
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    The student will structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning.
     
    The student will apply the appropriate conventions and elements of an expository essay.
     
    The student will revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed.
    The student will edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling.
     
    The student will write an [expository] essay of sufficient length that includes:
    (i)  Effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures
    (ii) Rhetorical devices, and transitions between  paragraphs
    (iii)               A thesis or controlling ideas
    (iv)              An organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context
    (v)                Relevant evidence and well-chosen details.
    (vi)              Distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, ideas that support the thesis statement.
     
    The student will write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
    (1) a clear thesis or position based on  logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
    (2) an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, & context;
    (3) an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, & ideas; and
    (4) a range of appropriate appeals.
     
    The student will use a variety of correctly structured sentences.
     
    The student will use conventions of capitalization.
     
    The student will use correct punctuation marks.
     
    The student will spell correctly,  and will use  various resources to determine and check correct spellings.
     
     
    The student will distinguish among different kinds of evidence used to support conclusions and arguments.
     
    The student will synthesize and make logical connections between ideas and details in several texts selected to reflect a range of viewpoints on the same topic and support those findings with textual evidence.
     
    The student will plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies  and developing a thesis or controlling ideas.
     
    The student will clarify the writing prompt and
    evaluate and synthesize collected information.
     
    The student will evaluate the relevance of information to the topic and determine the reliability, validity, and accuracy of sources by examining their authority and objectivity.
    The student will critique the research process at each step to implement changes as the need occurs and is identified.
     
    The student will organize and present his/her ideas and information according to the purpose of the essay and their audience. 
     
    The student will synthesize the information into a written or an oral presentation that marshals evidence in support of a clear thesis statement and related claims.
     
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
     
    The student will determine the meaning of grade-level technical academic English words in multiple content areas derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes.
     
    The student will analyze textual context to distinguish between the denotative and connotative meanings of words.
     
    The student will use general and specialized dictionaries, thesauri, histories of language, books of quotations, and other related references as needed.
     
     
     
     
     
    SpringBoard texts
    (SB)
     
    Glencoe Literature
    (GL)
    Literature included:
     
    “Where I’m From” by George Ella Lyson-SB
     
    Excerpts from Funny in Farsi by Firoozeh Dumas-SB
     
    “Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes-SB
     
    “My Mother Pieced Quilts” by Teresa Paloma Acosta-SB
     
    Everyday Use by Alice Walker-GL
     
    Excerpt from The Hunger of Memory by Richard Rodriguez-SB
     
    “Living Well.  Living Good.” by Maya Angelou-GL
     
     
    Straw Into Gold:  The Metamorphosis of  the Everyday by Sandra Cisneros-GL
     
     

    Notes for PreAP English II students:

    Reading and writing assignments listed apply to all English II students.  PreAP English II students may be assigned additional readings throughout the course of the 9 weeks period to expand the breadth of their knowledge.  They may also have additional writing assignments to hone their skills in preparation for the AP English Language & Composition exam administered at the end of the Junior year.

    PreAP English II Book Project:

    PreAP English II students have been given a list of books which represent different areas of the world.  Each student, in conjunction with his/her group, will select one set of books to read as the basis of their Book Project research and presentation (to be presented during the 4th. 9 weeks period).  Each student in a group will read and analyze each of the three (3) or four (4) books included in the set of titles chosen by the group.  Detailed instructions will be distributed by week 4 of the first 9 weeks grading period.

     

    Unit Topic:  Justice

     

    Time Frame

    TEKS

    Depth and Complexity

    I

    D

    M

    Non- Negotiable Resources

    NOTE:

     

    Standards listed are

    those

    tested on

    the STAAR/EOC

    exam.

     

    Additional

    standards are

    taught,

    especially

    listening &

    speaking

    standards

    READING READINESS STANDARDS:

     

    5(A)  Analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to the success of the plot as a whole in a variety of works of fiction.

     

    8(A)  Analyze the controlling idea and specific purpose of a passage and the textual elements that support and elaborate it, including both the most important details and the less important details.

     

    9(C)  Make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns.

     

    Fig. 19B  Make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding (Literary).

     

    READING SUPPORTING STANDARDS:

     

    2(A)  Compare and contrast differences in similar themes expressed in different time periods.

     

    2(B)  Analyze archetypes (e.g. journey of a hero, tragic flaw) in mythic, traditional and classical literature.

     

    4(B) Analyze how archetypes in drama affect the plot of plays.

     

    9(B)  Distinguish among different kinds of evidence (e.g., logical, empirical, anecdotal) used to support conclusions and arguments in texts.

     

    12(A)  Evaluate how messages presented in media

    reflect social and cultural views in ways different from traditional texts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    WRITING READINESS STANDARDS:

     

    13(B)  Structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outline, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning.

     

    13(C)  Revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed.

     

    13(D)  Edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling.

     

    16  Write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes

    (A)  A clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence.

    (B)  An organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, & context.

    (C)  An analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, & ideas.

    (D) A range of appropriate appeals (e.g., descriptions, anecdotes, case studies, analogies, and illustrations).

     

     

    The student will examine the varying perspectives on justice across cultures and over time.

     

    The student will recognize effective elements of persuasion or argument.

     

    The student will understand and articulate the nature of justice.

     

    The student will analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to the success of the plot as a whole in a variety of works of fiction.

     

    The student will analyze the controlling idea and specific purpose of a passage and the textual elements that support and elaborate it, including both the most important details and the less important details.

     

    The student will make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns.

     

    The student will make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding (Literary).

     

    The student will compare and contrast differences in similar themes expressed in different time periods.

     

    The student will analyze archetypes in mythic, traditional and classical literature.

    The student will relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting.

     

    The student will analyze how archetypes and motifs in drama affect the plot of plays.

     

    The student will analyze differences in the characters’ moral dilemmas in works of fiction across different countries or cultures.

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The student will successfully construct a persuasive argument.

     

    The student will evaluate the connection between forms of narration and tone in works of fiction.

     

    The student will evaluate the role of syntax and diction and the effect of voice, tone, and imagery on a speech, literary essay, or other forms of literary nonfiction.

     

    The student will explain the function of symbolism, allegory, and allusions in literary works.

     

    The student will explain shifts in perspective in arguments about the same topic and evaluate the accuracy of the evidence used to support the different viewpoints within those arguments.

     

    The student will analyze contemporary political debates for such rhetorical and logical fallacies as appeals to commonly held opinions, false dilemmas, appeals to pity, and personal attacks.

     

    The student will structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outline, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning.

     

    The student will revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed.

     

    The student will edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling.

     

    The student will use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking.

     

    The student will use a variety of correctly structured sentences.

     

    The student will use conventions of capitalization.

     

    The student will use correct punctuation marks.

     

    The student will spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

     

    The student will plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies  and developing a thesis or controlling.

     

    The student will advance a coherent argument that incorporates a clear thesis and a logical progression of valid evidence from reliable sources and that employs eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, purposeful gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively. 

     

     

     

     

     

    SpringBoard texts

    (SB)

     

    Glencoe Literature

    (GL)

     

    Laying the Foundations

    (LtF)

    Literature included:

     

    Excerpt from George W. Bush’s speech at Ground Zero after September 11, 2001-LtF

     

    Excerpt from Al Gore’s Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in 2004-LtF

     

    Excerpt from Maya Angelou’s eulogy for Coretta Scott King in 2006- LtF

     

    “America Needs its Nerds”-LtF

     

    “All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Nerd”-LtF

     

    Excerpt from Romeo and Juliet  by William Shakespeare-SB & an accompanying film clip

     

    Excerpt from Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare-SB & an accompanying film clip

     

    An Immodest Proposal by Anna Mulrine-SB

     

    Declaration of the Rights of the Child proclaimed by General Assembly Resolution1386- 09.20.59-SB

     

     An Unfair Dress Code?-SB

     

    Religious Expression by Nashala Hearn-SB

     

    Excerpt from On Civil Disobedience by Mohandis K. Ghandi-SB

     

    Excerpt from Letter from Birmingham Jail by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.-SB

     

    Antigone by Sophocles-SB